Kat Tretina

Kat Tretina

Kat Tretina is a freelance writer in Orlando, Florida. She double majored in English and Communications at Elizabethtown College, before going on to earn a Masters in Communications from West Chester University. She specializes in personal finance and is dedicated to helping people improve their financial futures.

  1. How to Build a Work Wardrobe (When You’re Broke)

    When I accepted the offer for my first job, I only had about $100 to create an entire work wardrobe. And when I walked into stores, I quickly found that my $100 wouldn’t buy a single dress. I was frustrated and panicking because my start date was just a few days away. Thankfully, I did some research and talked to friends, and got some smart ideas to find cheap work clothes. I was able to start work with many office-worthy outfits that looked great, without overextending my budget.

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  2. How to Get the Best Deal on a New Car

    If you’re a first-time car buyer, the process can be overwhelming and a little terrifying. The idea of going up against a tough car salesperson can feel like a losing proposition. However, there’s a way that even the shyest people can negotiate and get a great deal. Even better, you’ll be in an out of the dealership in under an hour.

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  3. 5 Best Places for a Summer Road Trip

    It’s already August, so there are just a few weeks left to summer. No more lazy days by the pool or trips to the beach. But before you start feeling down, there is still time to have one last adventure before returning to the regular grind. If you’re on a budget, you don’t need to spend a ton of money on hotels or airline tickets. With gas prices the lowest they’ve been in years, you can have an epic journey with family or friends with a summer road trip.

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  4. 5 Top-Paying Careers in 2017

    The average starting salary for new college graduates is $49,785. While that number is a healthy salary, financial demands can make it difficult to make ends meet. Graduates are leaving school with an average student loan balance of $37,172, which can eat up a significant part of their income.

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  5. How to Save Money on Textbooks

    While college tuition is expensive enough, coming up with the cash to pay for textbooks can be difficult. The cost of books has skyrocketed in recent years. Since 1978, the price of textbooks has risen 812 percent. The average undergraduate student will spend approximately $1,300 a year on books. That high cost can add thousands to your college education, or can prohibit you from buying necessary books.

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  6. 5 Best Cities For New College Graduates

    Graduating from college is an exciting time. You’re finally done with classes, term papers and exams. From starting a new job to moving out on your own, your life changes drastically after school. However, those changes can be expensive. With expenses like rent and student loan payments, making ends meet can be more challenging than you expected. In the United States, the average rental cost for a one-bedroom apartment is $1,021.

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  7. How to Score the Cheapest Flights

    When planning a vacation, your flight can be the most expensive part. It can be more than your hotel, car rental and food combined. A pricey flight can cut down on the number of things you can do on your trip, or even reduce how long your vacation can be.

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  8. 5 Surprisingly Affordable Tropical Destinations

    Traveling the world is the goal of many people. Visiting foreign countries, seeing landmarks, and sampling new cuisines can be an incredible experience. But the price can be prohibitive for many. If you dreamed of traveling the world but have been delaying take the plunge, you might be afraid of the cost. Planning a vacation when you’re on a budget can be difficult. However, there are some beautiful, tropical destinations that are shockingly affordable.

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  9. 5 Ways to Protect Your Credit When Traveling

    If you’re planning on traveling this summer, your credit cards are essential. You’ll need one to do everything from checking into a hotel to renting a car. While credit card theft and fraudulent charges are always a risk, it isn’t as big of a deal when you’re home. You can quickly cancel the cards, and your credit card company will send you new ones right away.

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  10. 3 Ways to Lower Your Credit Card Payment

    When it comes to credit cards, it’s easy to lose track of your budget and run up a balance. In fact, the average credit card debt per cardholder in the United States is $4,061. If you have a high-interest credit card, your balance can grow over time, increasing your minimum payment and making it difficult stay on track.

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  11. How Your Credit Score May Affect Your Job Search

    If you’re interviewing for a new job, you know the importance of a polished resume, personalized cover letter, professional interview attire, and preparedness. One of the most overlooked factors that can affect your chances of getting a job is your credit.

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  12. A New Grad’s Guide to Credit Cards

    If you’re a fresh graduate right out of college, life can feel overwhelming right now. You just finished four years (or more) of school and now have to face problems like finding a job, moving into your own apartment and paying down student loans. Getting a credit card is probably not a priority right now, but not having a credit card can make life more difficult.

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  13. How to Score Credit Card Incentives Without Going Broke

    When it comes to shopping for a new credit card, there are hundreds of bonus offers and sign-up incentives. Sometimes worth hundreds of dollars, credit card companies tempt thousands of airline miles or cash back rewards to convince you to apply for their card.

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  14. What You Should Know Before Doing a Balance Transfer

    Most Americans have credit card debt, and the average household has a balance of $5,700. With the mean interest rate on credit card debt rising to 13.6% percent, your balance can quickly balloon out of control. You can end up paying hundreds or even thousands in interest fees, making it difficult to ever get out of debt.

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  15. 6 Ways to Build Your Credit History

    When I graduated from college, apartment shopping was a nightmare. I had a good job, a decent entry-level salary and I was only looking for a small studio, yet I couldn’t get approved on my own. Because I had been starkly anti-debt and never had a credit card or car loan, I had something worse than a low credit score--I had no credit at all.

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Disclaimer: Information in these articles is brought to you by CreditSoup. Banks, issuers, and credit card companies mentioned in the articles do not endorse or guarantee, and are not responsible for, the contents of the articles.