Advice & Expertise Blog

Articles tagged #BuildingCredit

  1. Why You Need a Credit Card After Declaring Bankruptcy

    Why You Need a Credit Card After Declaring Bankruptcy

    When you declare bankruptcy, your credit score and report can be ruined, and it will remain on your credit report for seven to 10 years. However, that doesn’t mean you’re stuck with bad credit for a decade. You can start rebuilding your credit right away. Check out these tips to get you back on track.

  2. Stash Away Cash

    Stash Away Cash

    This week's bit of frugality focuses on a hard concept for some, or a "no-brainer" for others. Saving money! There's no better time to start than right now. Get in the habit of stashing away a few bucks each week!

  3. On a Mission to Build your Credit? Look no further!

    On a Mission to Build your Credit? Look no further!

    The Mission Lane Credit Builder Account is a no fee, zero interest loan that can help you build your credit history and increase your savings. The money from your loan is deposited into a secured savings account and as you pay down your loan, each payment increases your savings.

  4. Upcycle Your Closet

    Upcycle Your Closet

    This week's Thrifty Thursday saves you money by upcycling your own closet! Don't throw out those old clothes. Patch it, dye it, cut it, or give it to the dog! Considering the cost of clothes now days, whatever you choose to do with it will certainly help you save a TON of money in the long run!

  5. Building Credit from Scratch – The Dos and Don’ts

    Building Credit from Scratch – The Dos and Don’ts

    A secured credit card uses a cash deposit as collateral. Normally, the cash deposit will be equivalent to the spending limit on the credit card. This allows the issuer to lower their risk taking on a new credit card user. The collateral works as a back-up plan for the credit card issuer; if the credit card bill isn’t paid on time, the issuer can use the deposit to pay off the balance.


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